STUDENT ATHLETE’S GUIDE TO PROPER NUTRITION

STUDENT ATHLETE’S GUIDE TO PROPER NUTRITION
Authored By Matt Cooper 0 Comment(s)

STUDENT ATHLETE’S GUIDE TO PROPER NUTRITION

 

The information contained within the pages of this text, as well as all discussion of its subject matter,  are meant to support a healthy lifestyle.  They are not a substitute for medical advice, nor are they meant to treat or ameliorate any disease.  It is recommended that you consult with a qualified healthcare professional prior to embarking on any health and/or exercise program.  The information in this guide is meant to serve as a guideline and is also not a substitute for individual advising, coaching, or consulting.

 

Grocery Guide

Vegetables

Artichoke

Cucumbers

Parsnips

Arugula

Eggplant

Peppers (all kinds)

Asparagus

Endive

Pumpkin

Avocados

Fennel

Purslane

Beets/Beet Greens

Fiddlehead Ferns

Radishes

Bell Peppers

Garlic

Romaine Lettuce

Bok Choy

Green Beans

Rutabaga

Broccoli

Jerusalem Artichokes

Sea Vegetables

Broccoli Rabe

Jicama

Spinach

Brussels Sprouts

Kale

Squash

Cabbage

Kohlrabi

Swiss Chard

Carrots

Leeks

Tomatoes

Cauliflower

Mushrooms

Turnip Greens

Celery

Mustard Greens

Watercress

Celery Root

Olives

Collards

Onions

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Starches

Cassava

Sweet Potatoes

Yams

Potatoes

Wild Rice

Taro

 

Fish

Anchovies

Mahi Mahi

Salmon

Bass

Monkfish

Sardines

Cod

Mullet

Tilapia

Eel

Northern Pike

Tuna

Haddock

Orange Roughy

Walleye

Halibut

Perch

Any Other Wild Fish

Herring

Red Snapper

 

Mackerel

Rockfish

 

 

Shellfish

Abalone

Lobster

Scallops

Clams

Mussels

Shrimp

Crab

Oysters

 

Crayfish

Prawns

 

 

Meat and Poultry

Beef

Goat

Pork

Chicken

Lamb

Game Meat

Alligator

Emu

Rabbit

Bear

Goose

Snakes

Buffalo

Pheasant

Turkey

Caribou

Kangaroo

Venison

Duck

Ostrich

 

Elk

Quail

 

 

 

Organ Meats

Hearts

Liver

Sweetbreads

Kidney

Bone Marrow

Tongue

 

Eggs

Chicken

Goose

Roe/Caviar

Duck

Pheasant

Other Bird Eggs

Emu

Quail

 

 

Nuts and Seeds

Almonds

Pecans

Sunflower Seeds

Brazil Nuts

Pine Nuts

Walnuts

Hazelnuts

Pistachios

Derivative Butters

Hempseeds

Pumpkin seeds

 

Macadamias

Sesame Seeds

 

 

Healthy Fats/Oils

Avocado Oil

Macadamia Oil

Unprocessed Palm Oil

Butter/Ghee

Olive Oil

Walnut Oil

Coconut Oil/Milk

Sesame Oil

 

Lard

Tallow

Fruit

 

Preferred

Blackberries

Boysenberries

Gooseberries

Blueberries

Cranberries

Raspberries

 

 

 

Other Fruits

Apple

Honeydew Melon

Pears

Apricot

Kiwi

Persimmon

Banana

Lemon

Plums

Cantalope

Lime

Pomegranate

Cherries

Lychee

Rhubarb

Coconut

Mango

Star Fruit

Figs

Nectarine

Strawberries

Goji Berries

Orange

Tangerine

Grapefruit

Papaya

Watermelon

Grapes

Passion Fruit

All other fruits

Guava

Peaches

 

 

Spices and Herbs

Anise

Cumin

Peppermint

Basil

Dill

Rosemary

Black Pepper

Fennel

Sage

Cayenne Pepper

Ginger

Stevia

Chili Pepper

Mint

Tarragon

Cilantro

Mustard Seeds

Thyme

Coriander Seeds

Nutmeg

Turmeric

Cinnamon

Oregano

 

Cloves

Paprika

 

In Moderation

100% Full Fat Cream


Cheese


Coffee


Yogurt


Honey

 

 

 

 

Nutritional Supplements and Ergogenics

 

We live in a new world with new environmental factors being presented to us. Bad News? We’ve got more environmental toxins, chemicals, pollution, stress, food quality challenges, and other biological insults.  Good news? We can take advantage of modern technologies.  However, the supplement world is a difficult sphere to navigate.  It is paramount to understand what you SHOULD and SHOULD NOT be taking for health, safety, and athletic regulations.  We recommend health, training, and nutrition analysis from a qualified professional to evaluate any potential supplementation questions prior to usage.  Further supplementation may or may not apply, depending on the individual.  Doses are purely samples only due to age variance in the student athlete-young adult spectrum.  That said, here is a cheat sheet to help.

 

  • Omega-3 (4g daily)

 

  • Vitamin D3 (5-10,000 IU daily)

 

  • Probiotic (1 capsule at bedtime)

 

  • Essential Amino Acid (EAA)/Branched Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) (5-10g pre, intra, or post-exercise/game

 

  • Grass-Fed Whey Protein/Collagen Protein/Rice Protein Isolate (shakes or bar-based) (20-25g post-exercise or as needed)

 

  • Unrefined Sea Salt ( 1-2 tsp daily added to water)

 

  • Low/No Sugar Electrolytes (serving size varies; intra-game or endurance-based training sessions).

 

  • Magnesium (lesser deficiency probability in young population; 100-300mg daily before bed)

 

  • Exogenous Ketones (1 serving pre-exercise, training, or game as a stimulant-free, fully-hydrating pre-workout upgrade)

 

 

 

Student-Athlete Nutritional Guidelines

 

 

 

-Ancestral Eating: The majority of your diet should consist of whole, nutrient-dense foods that we evolved to eat rather than processed, refined junk.  Aim for an 80/20 ratio, ideally and use the grocery list provided as an example.

 

-Respect Your Rest: Do not neglect your rest.  It is easy to let rest fall by the wayside with an emphasis on training, practice, games, food, and social life, not to mention keeping up with the academic schedule.  Sleep no less than seven hours and give yourself a license to aim for above 8, approaching 9 as much as possible.  Try not to schedule heavy lifting days or grueling endurance conditioning sessions back-to-back.  Reduce your screen time and exposure to artificial blue light at night.  If you have to do homework, use the anti-blue light settings on your device(s) or wear blue blocker glasses.  Put your phone on airplane mode and power down your WiFi at night for best practice.

 

-Plan Ahead: Don’t be a victim of your own schedule.  Carry backup snacks, water, potentially supplements with you in your locker, gym bag, backpack, etc.  Have on-the-go options dialed in so if you have to eat on the go, you’re stopping by a healthy option-think grocery store hot counter-rather than fast food.

 

-Cycle Caloric Intake: Also known as eating for exercise demands.  To optimally recover, build muscle mass, perform optimally, all while keeping body fat at a minimum, tailor your intake of food to what you are doing.  On a day of full practice, sprinting, or strength work, you’re going to be eating more.  If you’re just running drills or resting?  You’ll need to eat less.  On that note...

 

-Know What Fuel to Use: If you’re in the weight room for strength and conditioning, you’re going to want to be more biased towards higher carbohydrate intake.  If you’re resting or practicing simple drills (i.e. shootaround), you’re likely going to want to have your food involve a higher fat intake over carbs.

 

-Eat Purposefully: Eat for enjoyment and taste-the palate is one of the gifts we’ve been given in life-but eat for your goals most of the time.  Each choice you make is going to move you more towards or away your finish line.  Don’t forget that.

 

-Timing: Timing isn’t everything with nutrition, but it’s still important.  Capitalize on your recovery period post-exercise with a properly timed meal.  Don’t skip meals, either.  Try to eat 3-4 large, square meals instead of grazing throughout the day, even if younger adults can get away with it more than their elders.  Of course, there are exceptions to these rules, but in the young pop, these are good rules of thumb.

 

-Hydrate: Drink enough water daily and increase this amount by 10-20% on training days.  Balance this out with proper electrolyte intake and don’t be afraid to add unrefined sea salt to your water or food.

 

-Mindfulness: Consider the power of meditation and visualization.  Phil Jackson, Jordan, Kobe, Markieff Morris, DeMar DeRozan, Kevin Love, Luka Doncic, and many other athletes recognize the importance of the mental game for performance.  LeBron says the game is about 80% mental.  The Mavericks are an example of a team who have an on-staff mental performance coach.  For added support, try a free app for morning meditation such as Lucid, Buddhify, etc. or checking out the


POST COMMENTS

Leave a comment


Please note, comments must be approved before they are published

Scroll To Top